Welcome to Boston

Here is a collection of fun things to do while in Boston

 

Pizzeria Regina, founded in 1926 and located in Boston’s North End, is the place to go for brick-oven pizza in Boston. This recommendation is for the original location, as opposed to the chains around the city. Lines may get lengthy and lunch and dinner on weekends, or soon before Celtics and Bruins games. In any case, it’s well worth the wait! Recommendation: The Margherita or the Pollo Pesto

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The Chart House Restaurant is housed in an incredible landmark location on Boston’s Long Wharf. The Gardiner Building (built 1763) was the counting office of none other than American Patriot and merchant John Hancock. The original safe from his office is still in a wall which the very cordial staff will be glad to display. Combine this extraordinary waterfront setting with the delicious cuisine of the 29-restaurant Chart House chain and a quiet to moderate ambience ideal for romantic or special occasions.

The Top of the Hub Restaurant, located on the 52nd floor of the Prudential Tower, offers guests an amazing view to accompany a great meal. The price tag may not be cheap, but compared to the price of a walk on the observation deck alone, it is well worth it. The lunch menu is a good option as well for a nice daytime view of the city. Live jazz at select times is an added bonus. Be mindful of dress codes and dinner reservations. Also, make a request for the east facing view of the John Hancock tower.

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  Newbury Street  – Take a scroll down Boston’s most popular walking street, located in the Back Bay. The one mile stretch features premier shopping - from boutique shops, jewelers, salons, art galleries and cafes line the one mile stretch.      Massachusetts State House  – The golden-domed Massachusetts state capitol was built in 1804. At the top of Beacon Hill, visit the golden-domed state capitol of Massachusetts. The building was designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. It was originally wood crafted, then copper plated by Paul Revere. Free daily tours are available from 10am-330pm.   New England Aquarium  – The largest Aquarium in New England, renovated in 2013, is a fantastic attraction for families in Boston. The four-story 200,000 gallon Giant Ocean Tank stands in between many other animals including penguins and sea lions, among 70 total exhibits. The IMAX theatre at the aquarium is also New England’s largest screen.   Boston Public Library  – Boston’s central public library, with the McKim building’s Renaissance Revival architecture, offers daily tours. A new children’s section and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center are also highlights.

Newbury Street – Take a scroll down Boston’s most popular walking street, located in the Back Bay. The one mile stretch features premier shopping - from boutique shops, jewelers, salons, art galleries and cafes line the one mile stretch.

 

Massachusetts State House – The golden-domed Massachusetts state capitol was built in 1804. At the top of Beacon Hill, visit the golden-domed state capitol of Massachusetts. The building was designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. It was originally wood crafted, then copper plated by Paul Revere. Free daily tours are available from 10am-330pm.

New England Aquarium – The largest Aquarium in New England, renovated in 2013, is a fantastic attraction for families in Boston. The four-story 200,000 gallon Giant Ocean Tank stands in between many other animals including penguins and sea lions, among 70 total exhibits. The IMAX theatre at the aquarium is also New England’s largest screen.

Boston Public Library – Boston’s central public library, with the McKim building’s Renaissance Revival architecture, offers daily tours. A new children’s section and the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center are also highlights.

  Museum of Fine Arts  – This world renowned art museum located in Boston Fenway district is one of the nation’s largest museums and has over one million annual visitors. The beautiful Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is also nearby and will take your breath away   Boston Children’s Museum  – A great escape for children and families, with a focus on early childhood development, the 3-floor museum has three themes: arts, culture, and science.   Rose Kennedy Greenway –  A beautiful walking park which runs from South Station to North Station between Boston’s waterfront and financial districts.   Esplanade  – Along Boston’s Charles River, take a spectacular walk, run, or bike ride. Conveniently enter from Charles Circle, Arlington Street, Fairfield Street, or Massachusetts Avenue.   Boston Tea Party  – Replicas of the ships, live actors, high-tech interactive exhibits, and original artifacts bring together an incredible interactive experience where visitors relive one of the most significant events in American history.   Museum of Science  – A fantastic escape for both children and adults to not only learn a thing or two, but to have a great time. Come visit the Theatre of Electricity, the Mugar Omni IMAX Theatre, or the recently renovated Hayden Planetarium.   Fenway Park  – The oldest ballpark in America turned 100 in 2012. Catch a game or take a tour.   Franklin Park Zoo  – Accessible by the Orange line, come visit the 220 animal species. Boston Harbor Islands – Take a ferry to experience Boston’s wonderful Harbor Islands this summer or fall. Ferries are available in Boston’s North End next to Christopher Columbus Park. An information pavilion is located near the Marriott Long Wharf.   Acorn Street  is a picturesque scene, located just off Charles St. at the flat of Beacon Hill

Museum of Fine Arts – This world renowned art museum located in Boston Fenway district is one of the nation’s largest museums and has over one million annual visitors. The beautiful Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is also nearby and will take your breath away

Boston Children’s Museum – A great escape for children and families, with a focus on early childhood development, the 3-floor museum has three themes: arts, culture, and science.

Rose Kennedy Greenway – A beautiful walking park which runs from South Station to North Station between Boston’s waterfront and financial districts.

Esplanade – Along Boston’s Charles River, take a spectacular walk, run, or bike ride. Conveniently enter from Charles Circle, Arlington Street, Fairfield Street, or Massachusetts Avenue.

Boston Tea Party – Replicas of the ships, live actors, high-tech interactive exhibits, and original artifacts bring together an incredible interactive experience where visitors relive one of the most significant events in American history.

Museum of Science – A fantastic escape for both children and adults to not only learn a thing or two, but to have a great time. Come visit the Theatre of Electricity, the Mugar Omni IMAX Theatre, or the recently renovated Hayden Planetarium.

Fenway Park – The oldest ballpark in America turned 100 in 2012. Catch a game or take a tour.

Franklin Park Zoo – Accessible by the Orange line, come visit the 220 animal species. Boston Harbor Islands – Take a ferry to experience Boston’s wonderful Harbor Islands this summer or fall. Ferries are available in Boston’s North End next to Christopher Columbus Park. An information pavilion is located near the Marriott Long Wharf.

Acorn Street is a picturesque scene, located just off Charles St. at the flat of Beacon Hill

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Getting Around Boston

Visitors to Boston may find that getting around is fairly easy...or not. The truth is that Boston is like a jigsaw puzzle. Those looking for a simple grid layout with parallel or perpendicular streets will have to keep looking. Old cow paths of colonial days developed into most of our streets of today. This seemingly random layout is part of what gives the city its charm and character, but can also make it difficult for visitors to navigate. The city itself is actually not very big, and with a little help visitors should be able to find their way whether by foot, bicycle, public transportation, or taxi. We don’t recommend visitors follow the expression to “Pahk ya Cah in Hahvahd Yahd,” or anywhere in Boston or Cambridge for that matter. Navigation is difficult, parking is costly, and a ticket, tow, or getting lost may spoil the day. Because of Boston’s size and large sidewalks, it has a reputation for being a great walking city. 5 to 30 minutes by foot will get you many places in the downtown area, and in good weather walking can be quite enjoyable. Governor Patrick was even spotted walking through Boston Common recently from Beacon Hill towards the Back Bay. Public transportation, known in Boston as the “T” is also an economical, convenient, and simple option. The Green, Orange, Red, and Blue subway lines will get you most places. Leave a couple extra minutes to navigate in and around the stations. The system is fairly basic and maps can be found easily. The Silver line was added in 2004 as an accordion style shuttle bus to provide convenient service to Logan Airport and the emerging Seaport District. The T also has connecting buses and a commuter rail to serve passengers to Salem, Plymouth, Concord, Providence, and more.

 

Old State House Museum

If you are planning a trip to Boston and enjoy history, you will love the Old State House museum, which recently celebrated its 300th anniversary and is loaded with artifacts and exhibits from early colonial days, specializing in the American Revolution as it began in and around Boston. The building is frequently renovated for preservation, with most recent projects on the original 1713 weathervane and the lion and unicorn statues atop the façade. See the site of the Boston Massacre and location where Governor Hutchinson appeared after the shots were fired. This exhibit includes John Bufford’s 1857 chromolithograph of William Champney’s 1856 Massacre portrayal. The museum has many fun and kid friendly interactive exhibits, and 30-minute tours are included with admission.